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Disciplinary Case Studies

Evolution Disciplinary Case Studies

Foundations of Science: Evolution 4:30PM 

 Antonia Monteiro -  "Novel Traits" - antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg

Description: We share this planet with life forms that are wonderfully diverse and display a variety of novel traits. How do these traits originate at the developmental level? How does the environment control trait development? And how will environmental change impact trait development and trait evolution?

Jen Sheridan - "Biogeography" - jasheridan@gmail.com

Description:  Introduction to patterns of species distributions & diversity, and factors influencing such patterns. Course will introduce students to the field of biogeography so that they understand why organisms exist in the places they do, and what contributes to species distribution and diversity patterns. Additionally, students should be able to apply this knowledge to predict how these will change in the face of anthropogenic factors.

Stanislav Presolski - "Chemistry of Life" - stanislav.presolski@gmail.com

Description: Life! From a chemist's perspective. The fundamental building blocks of everything that surrounds us will be discussed, from simple gases, liquids and solids, through man-made dyes, drugs and plastics, all the way to the chemistry of living things. We will explore the interactions between matter and energy that constitute our everyday experiences and attempt to make sense of them all through just a few general concepts. Mischief. Mayhem. Soap.

Bryan Penprase - "Finding and Maintaining a Habitable Planet" - bryan.penprase@yale-nus.edu.sg

Description: From the billions of years of cosmic history our Earth has emerged as a lively habitat for a diverse range of creatures. We will explore some of the cosmic history that produced our Earth, and the natural forces that shape the formation of stars and solar systems. We will also explore how new solar systems are discovered, and how astronomers determine whether they are habitable. Within this exploration will be a consideration of the factors that make planets, including the earth, habitable and how changes to those parameters through distortions of the atmosphere, oceans, and reflectivity from cloud cover change the temperatures of the Earth and other planets.

The other group of students, enrolled in "Revolution" will choose between the disciplinary case studies listed below.


Revolution Disciplinary Case Studies

Foundations of Science: Revolutions 2:30PM 

 Andrew Bettiol - "Modern Physics and the Silicon Revolution " a.bettiol@nus.edu.sg

Description:  At the end of the 19th century, scientists believed that they had a good understanding of how the universe worked. The fundamental physical laws developed by Isaac Newton were able to accurately describe the motion of objects as large as planets and Maxwell’s pioneering work in unifying electricity and magnetism enabled us to a describe wave nature of light. These theories were to forever change the way in which we see and understand nature and the universe. They laid down the theoretical foundations that have led to the development of almost all of the modern technology that we use today.  In this unit, we will begin by studying quantum theory by exploring the new revolutionary ideas that were developed in the early part of the 20th century. In addition we will explore the key experiments that verified these ideas. We will then discuss how these theories have led to many of the technologies that we use today. In particular we will look at the development of semiconductors that ultimately led to the development of the computer. Finally we will see how another scientific revolution will be necessary in order for us to continue to develop our modern technology.

Simon Perrault - "Interaction with Mobile and Wearable Computers"perrault.simon@gmail.com

Description: Miniaturization has allowed computers to go from the size of a large main frame to a personal computer and then laptop. While laptops changed computer usage by allowing (limited) mobile usage of computers, the real revolution was when PDAs and smartphones hit the market, coupled with affordable wireless data transfer. The upcoming wearable computers will also propose new features and capabilities leading to seamless interaction, as these devices are embedded directly on their users and can thus access to a large quantity of private data (conversations, health information, etc...). In this unit, we will focus on mobile and wearable computers and how these devices changed the way we interact with each other and also with machines in general. Students will get a clear overview of the different sensors that are either found or can easily be added to mobile devices and how they operate. The unique new usages of wearable computers will be demonstrated as well as applications for mobile health and large scale data gathering. Students will also have an opportunity to build simple prototypes using Arduino and make them communicate together. Finally, the drawbacks of these devices particularly in terms of privacy will be discussed.

Lerwen Liu - "Nanotechnology and Sustainability" lerwen@nano-globe.biz

Description: This unit will introduce the latest exciting development of nanotechnology through elaborating the making of smart phones and how nanotechnology will transform various industries including aerospace, construction, automotive, electronics, energy, medicine, environment & water and much more. The unit will explore multifunctional nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing technologies which will impact the future smartphone and wearable devices, and will address the role of nanotechnology in our efforts of building a social, environmental and economic sustainable future through the concept of use less for more. Students will also gain training in soft skills through business plan practice on holistic design of real world solutions utilizing technological innovation addressing sustainability.

Brian McAdoo - "Earthquakes" -  brian.mcadoo@yale-nus.edu.sg

Description: What is an earthquake?  Where, when, and how often do they occur?  How do we know the record of past earthquakes in a given region?  How is energy transferred over vast distances efficiently enough to level a building?  And what is it about earthquakes that, despite our best efforts, still trigger such tremendous losses?  We begin with the geophysical fundamentals of plate tectonics, then explore the nature of seismic wave propagation and how it leads to buildings falling down and killing people.  To do this, we are going to use Tokyo, Los Angeles, Istanbul and Sumatra as case studies, and work to ‘predict’ when the next disaster will hit.

 

 


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